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Shabbat is coming – Return to Gan Eden

November 15, 2018
Orit Esther Riter
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BS’D

There are also many similarities between Erev Shabbat preparations and those we should focus on everyday in preparing for the World to Come:

• We work within a limited time frame & avoid wasting time,
• Constantly build, plan and prepare,
• Focus our activities and attention towards a future-oriented-goal

Shabbat enables our Divine soul to be freed from its exile to live in total connection to G-d. The Arizal teaches that on Shabbat we gain a sense of unity from receiving our additional soul. Though Adam HaRishon was driven out of Gan Eden, a part of his soul remained there. On Shabbat, G-d releases that part of his soul and gives it back to man. Thus, on Shabbat we are essentially given the opportunity to return to Gan Eden.

Shabbat is Coming – Like the World to Come

November 8, 2018
Orit Esther Riter
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BS’D

Some of the many similarities between Shabbat and the World to Come include:

• We prepare our bodies physically in a similar way as we do when we depart from this world – washed, nails trimmed and dressed in white.

• We cease to create, build or prepare on Shabbat. In the World to Come, we enjoy the fruits of the lifetime of work in this world.

• The nature of Shabbat is constant and eternal. The way things are at the onset of Shabbat remains the same throughout Shabbat, reflecting the elevated spiritual status of the soul when it has transitioned from this world to the next.

A sweet taste of the World to Come!

Shabbat is coming – Relax

November 1, 2018
Orit Esther Riter

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BS’D

All of our week should serve Shabbat. Shabbat should be an intimate meeting with G-d, without the distraction of material temptation. If we rearrange the letters of Shabbat, we can spell ‘teshev’ (return). Shabbat represents a return to the perfect state – a unity of spirit that replaces the fragmentation of the workweek.

Shabbat is a day where we sit ‘shev’. Whereas the six days are a state of ‘becoming’, Shabbat is a day of ‘being’. The idea of sitting relates to a state of rest – a break in the constant struggle to balance the spiritual and physical aspects of life.

Shabbat and The World to Come

February 23, 2016
Orit Esther Riter

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BS’D


All of our week should serve Shabbat. Shabbat should be an intimate meeting with Hashem, without the distraction of material temptation. If we rearrange the letters of Shabbat, we can spell ‘teshev’ (return). Shabbat represents a return to the perfect state – a unity of spirit that replaces the fragmentation of the workweek.

Shabbat is a day where we sit ‘shev’. Whereas the six days are a state of ‘becoming’, Shabbat is a day of ‘being’. The idea of sitting relates to a state of rest – a break in the constant struggle to balance the spiritual and physical aspects of life.

Some of the many similarities between Shabbat and the World to Come include:

• We prepare our bodies physically in a similar way as we do when we depart from this world – washed, nails trimmed and dressed in white.

• We cease to create, build or prepare on Shabbat. In the World to Come, we enjoy the fruits of the lifetime of work in this world.

• The nature of Shabbat is constant and eternal. The way things are at the onset of Shabbat remains the same throughout Shabbat, reflecting the elevated spiritual status of the soul when it has transitioned from this world to the next.

There are also many similarities between erev Shabbat preparations and the preparations here for the World to Come:

• working within a limited time frame to avoid wasting time,
• constantly building and planning and preparing,
• focusing our activities and attention towards a future-oriented-goal

Shabbat enables our Divine soul to be freed from its exile to live in total connection to Hashem. The Arizal teaches that on Shabbat we gain a sense of unity from receiving our additional soul. Though Adam HaRishon was driven out of Gan Eden, a part of his soul remained there. On Shabbat, Hashem releases that part of his neshama and gives it back to man. Thus, on Shabbat we are essentially given the opportunity to return to Gan Eden.

Shabbat brings 100% clarity

February 27, 2014
Orit Esther Riter

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BS’D

Perek 82 of tehillim is appropriately named the Shabbat perek, “Mizmor Shir l’yom HaShabbat…” since this is how it begins.  However, the entire perek speaks nothing of Shabbat; only how Hashem interacts with the world.   So what is the connection to Shabbat?

All week long we are involved in the ‘project of life’ – securing our livelihood and interacting with the world at large.  The Sfat Emet ztk’l brings down that in order to genuinely feel tranquil on Shabbat we must internalize the feeling that our weeklong activities are complete. They are not on hold until Motzei Shabbat; but complete. This explains how Shabbat is a foretaste of the World to Come being that is when our mission in this world has been completed and the events of our life become crystal clear in every sense.

On Shabbat we are privileged to dip into this realm of clarity. While our minds are calm and B’H detached from this world, things make better sense; we can see full-circle.  This precious day called Shabbat awards us with the ability to attain a level of emuna whereby we can visibly see Hashem’s justice in the world.

As we learn by the conclusion to this perek, “To declare that Hashem is upright, my rock in Whom there is no injustice.”  If we correctly prepare ourselves for Shabbat and let go of all ‘unfinished’ business, our minds will settle and be able to comprehend a glimpse (1/60th) of Hashem’s justice.  We can then attempt to see some of the full circle and attain a level in which we see Hashem’s hand in guiding the world in the most just and fair way.

We may not understand, but we must have emuna shleimah, complete and genuine faith that Hashem is 100% just.

Today’s daily dose of emuna is dedicated to the refuah shleimah of Dan ben Yael.  He faces possible surgery of his face and throat after his cancer returned to his face and jaw area r”l.  May HaKadosh Baruch Hu shower him with a complete healing amongst all of Klal Yisrael who are sick and suffering bkarov, b’rachamim, Amen.

Fill up on Shabbat

February 20, 2014
Orit Esther Riter

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BS’D

Today, 20th of Adar is the yahrtzeit of Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (1910-1995), leader of Jerusalem Jewry for much of the 20th century. Rabbi Auerbach was beloved for his piety and concern for every Jew. Incredibly, Rabbi Auerbach testified that throughout his entire marriage, he and his wife never once offended or hurt one another.  (Aish.com)  May we merit to emulate his ways and may he serve as a holy advocate for Klal Yisrael on high, Amen!

Before Shabbat Kodesh enters into the world we should prepare ourselves by doing a spiritual self-accounting so that we may appear before the Shabbat Queen with a restored aura.

The Shulchan Aruch brings down that erev Shabbat encases within it all days of that week just as Rosh Chodesh does all the days of that month.  Consequently, when we do chesbon nefesh, self-evaluation of where we are holding spiritually on erev Shabbat in effect we are rectifying the entire week.

Our essence during the workweek is poles apart from our quintessence on Shabbat. It is not merely an elevated state, but an entirely new formation of who we are.  During the six days we ‘relate’ to HaKadosh Baruch Hu as a child to their father.  Yet on Shabbat we ascend to the level of ‘His soul companion’, rising to a completely elevated creation.

To the degree that we prepare ourselves to tightly bond with the Shechinah, we are injected with closeness to Hashem.  Our task is to safeguard ourselves from all possible barriers (such as negative thoughts, speech and actions to the largest extent possible) that wish to interfere with this spiritual union.

We learn this from the passuk, “v’Shamru B’nai Yisrael et HaShabbat (B’nai Yisrael shall observe the Shabbat).”  Our calling is to preciously hold onto the Shabbat spirit by embracing her importance and honoring her presence.

When a person desecrates Shabbat c”v he is called Mechalel Shabbat.  The word mechalel is derived from the root word chalal (hollow).  The holiness of Shabbat fills us up but we need to guard it otherwise it may leave us.  What will remain in its place? an inner sense of hollowness that can only be filled by the holiness of Shabbat.

Today’s Daily Dose of Emuna is dedicated to the refuah shleimah of Malka Shoshana bat Tzivya.  May Hashem shower her with rachamei Shamayim and a complete healing of her knee amongst all of Klal Yisrael who are sick and suffering and a zivug hagun b’karov, Amen.

Settling our minds

February 13, 2014
Orit Esther Riter

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BS’D

Tomorrow it begins… the 40 DAY GLOBAL GRATITUDE REVOLUTION….

Watch and see how this campaign will transform your life…

Visit the ’40 Day Global Gratitude Page’ on our website to sign up:  www.DailyDoseOfEmuna.com

PLEASE PASS IT ON TODAY TO EVERYONE AND JOIN!

The workweek feeds us conflicting ta’ivot (desires), emotions and thoughts.  We must search for the the Shabbat within; a time to reflect on the goal and destination of life.  This can only occur when we cease our mundane activities.

As we begin to nullify our pursuits to Hashem, to go on ‘strike’, a transformation will evolve.  We are filled with false notions, inflated egos, and intellectual philosophies.  It is time to release it all and go beyond time, change and space and direct all of our energy into a time beyond time – Shabbat Kodesh.   It is time to sit and allow our thoughts to settle – yishuv ha’da’at, a settling of the mind.

Surrendering our will to Hashem and embracing His constant presence is a gift we all deserve.  The Divine vitality that we so desperately seek is overflowing and need only be taken on Shabbat.  Let us prepare ourselves by making room within for Hashem to enter.  Cleaning out our ‘storage of thoughts’ and experiencing internal silence is the pathway to yishuv ha’da’t, mindfulness, serenity of mind.

At least once a week we should settle our emotional accounts and take responsibility for our actions.  Stop the motions and contemplate the meaning.  Settle ‘old accounts,’ clear the air within and with others as this invites the Shechinah to reside within us.

If we didn’t receive this once a week reminder called Shabbat we may never stop.

Hashem says ‘Stop, think and then proceed.’ You’ll find me along the way, B’H. Have a wonderful Shabbat Kodesh.

Today’s Daily Dose of Emuna is dedicated to the refuah shleimah of Yehudit Aliza bat Batya Chana a young woman who is undergoing surgery for a mass found on her brain on Monday.  Please, please Hashem may rachamei Shamayim shower this beautiful neshama with complete healing b’riut hanefesh v’b’riut haguf amongst all of Klal Yisrael who are sick and suffering b’karov, b’rachamim, Amen.

Don’t get excited…it’s just a show!

January 30, 2014
Orit Esther Riter

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BS’D

Thanks to all who have contributed to this cause in the past.  This goes 100% directly to the soon to be wedded couple. A special request came my way via close friends of ours in Monsey, NY.  A 22-year-old boy, Yehuda from Yerushalayim, is getting married B’H on the 5th of Adar A’.  He is the oldest of 11 children, father is a Sofer Stam, family is extremely poor, and their home is maxed in mortgage funds. Please, if there is anything that anyone can contribute to assist this amazing talmid, it is desperately needed. Pass it on. You can contact his uncle in Monsey Yaron Yehuda at email:  Yaron2802@gmail.com.  Tizku’ l’mitzvot.

 

All week long our mind races endlessly – we are stuck in the world of commerce.  The important questions in life like, ‘Why am I here in this world’ finds a difficult time gaining attention.  Rav Avigdor Miller ztk’l teaches that on Shabbat we must abstain from the mundane habits that occupy us so we may pay attention to questions like these.

The goal of refraining from these habits is to prevent us from becoming slaves onto this world.  The Chovot Halevavot teaches that we were given the gift of Shabbat so that our minds cease being enslaved to the ‘thinking’ of this world.   Shabbat encourages us to shift our minds and relish in menucha (peacefulness). This mental and physical state of disconnecting from the world enables us to get to ‘know’ Hashem.  In as much as we are able to ‘empty’ out our minds from thinking about this world and all that we didn’t complete and all that awaits us on motzei Shabbat, we will make room for the much needed state of menuchat hanefesh (peace of mind) to enter.

This world is imaginary.  The only thing that is real is Hashem.  The RamBam is Hilchot Yesodei Torah writes, ‘Hu Levado Emet (He is the only One who is true {reality})’, all of the rest is an illusion.  Consequently, when we worry and grow anxious about anything in life, it is the yetzer hara placing shadows and phantoms for us to get ‘excited’ over.

We hustle and bustle running around, planning and fixing, confused over what will happen next; we get ‘excited’ over the well-planned show. The Gemara in Masechet Shabbat then teaches us a remarkable lesson, ‘When you make kiddush, you restore your eyesight.’  How?  By saying the words, “…vayachulu HaShamayim v’ha’aretz v’kol Tzeva’am… (… and the Heavens and earth were completed, and all their hosts…)”.

You think you are in control; well that is if you worry.  What are you getting ‘excited’ about?  Kiddush realigns our thinking by reminding us that Hashem made everything from start to its completion and it is only Him who controls it all.  How important it is for us to hear this reminder every erev Shabbat.  B’H may we internalize its message so that it carries us throughout the week as well.

 

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